Media

I try to make sure I give at least a few talks a year, but mostly I end up giving more than a few. I'll list some of the upcoming ones here from time to time. Also you can see some previous interviews I've given. I wouldn't recommend it--I've never been able to bring myself to watch them (actually I've never watched any of the links below for the simple reason that no sane person should want to watch their own talks.) But if you wanted to for some reason, here's a Bloggingheads video of (the really clever and fun) Jonathan Phillips and me talking about beliefs:  http://bloggingheads.tv/videos/20056

Here's a recent interview I did on Bayesianism for the Royal Statistical Society's magazine Significance:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1740-9713.2016.00935.x/full

And here's the Science Network's interview with the Cognitive Science Societies Dissertation Prize winners. The other guys interviewed here (Ed Vul and Michael Frank) have done some truly groundbreaking work, so it might be worth watching it to hear what they say. http://thesciencenetwork.org/programs/cogsci-2011/panel-1-3

Here's a Psychology Today blog post (by the wonderful Josh Knobe) on some experimental work of mine on mental illness and responsibility: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/experiments-in-philosophy/200805/can-the-mentally-ill-be-blame 

Here's the Youtube link to my 2015 Stockholm talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MawVpJE3zDA

Lastly, here's a link to a podcast of the NPR gameshow 'Ask Me Another.' I haven't listened to it myself, but I was a contestant and guest along with Tiny Desk Contest winner Gaelynn Lea and the incomparable Bob Boilen. Gaelynn's music is really moving, and Bob Boilen is a freaking national treasurer. Getting to spend a long evening talking music with Bob is up there with the best random nights I can remember (and I once brought Yo La Tengo to high table at Oxford [Catz]). Anyway, the cast of AMA is excellent too--Ofira, Art, and Jonathan are all excellent and hilarious so it's worth listening to their podcast regardless of whether I'm there. But here's the link to my episode: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/bob-boilen-gaelynn-lea-whats/id524978407?i=1000369969597&mt=2

Upcoming Talks

I realize that I don't update this enough to reflect what I'm actually doing. This seems to get updated once a year maybe? I've decided to not list any department colloquia and instead just public events where its quite likely that there will be other people around who will show me where my work goes awry, and which strike me as interesting enough that I'd travel to go to them even were I not involved. Anyway, here are some of those.

12/15/17 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm (Workshop entitled "Thinking about Thinking." This will be excellent, as its a small set of really excellent people from a bunch of different perspectives on thought. For example, Google's "Deep Mind" will be represented, as well as Bayesian and more traditional approaches to thought. Disciplines represented: biology, ethology, computer science, philosophy, and psychology).

2/16/18: UC Santa Barbara (Conference on belief, which will be very cool as it's a small set of people with different backgrounds within philosophy, e.g., moral psychology, epistemology, normative ethics, and whatever exactly it is that I do).

3/17/18: SSPP, San Antonio (Session on associationist models of thought, which will be rocking as it has some of the leading proponents of associationist models speaking, and also has some guy who thinks those models don't work all that well whose last name ends with "andelbaum.")

4/20/18: Hamline University (Public lecture entitled "The Intellect's Shadow." I like the title though I admit to not 100% understanding it. Nevertheless, it should be amazing as there are three big lectures over two days, with the two others given by Eric Asp, a neuroscientist doing extremely interesting interdisciplinary work on belief acquisition, and the incomparable Dan Gilbert [not the awful Cavs owner, but the psychologist whose seminal work opened up multiple new avenues of research]. He is one of the most important cognitive scientists ever and somehow that is overshadowed by how seriously funny he is. And yes, he is the one from the Prudential commercials]. This will be an excellent venue for learning about the cognitive science of propaganda, or to just laugh some.

 Thanks to Jacob Hohwy for the picture in front of the Royal Swedish Academy of the Sciences. Pretty sure he wouldn't agree w/ any of the other content on this site though, except for my occasionally breathless claims about the early 2010s Spurs.

Thanks to Jacob Hohwy for the picture in front of the Royal Swedish Academy of the Sciences. Pretty sure he wouldn't agree w/ any of the other content on this site though, except for my occasionally breathless claims about the early 2010s Spurs.